In Memoriam | 2022

Questions concerning employee deaths should be directed to the Office of Casualty Assistance at (202) 736-4302. Inquiries concerning deaths of retired employees should be directed to the Office of Retirement at (202) 261-8960. For specific questions on submitting an obituary, please contact Amanda McCarthy at mccarthyar@state.gov.


June 2022

John E. Hall, 81, died April 27, in The Villages, Fla. In 1963, Hall graduated from Ohio Northern University and, in 1970, received a degree from Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine as an osteopathic physician. He served in family medicine until 1994, and then served in academic medicine. In 2001, he joined the Foreign Service as a regional medical officer and served at posts in Lagos, Beijing, and Cairo. He retired from the Department of State in 2006, and returned to academic medicine with a Duke University affiliated Family Practice Residency Program, where he served until 2015. Hall enjoyed traveling, sailing, golfing, bridge, and walking his many dogs. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Elizabeth; three children, Chiara, Amy, and Sean; and five grandchildren. 

Charles Stuart “Stu” Kennedy Jr., 92, died Jan. 3, in Falls Church, Va. Kennedy served in the U.S. Air Force’s intelligence branch during the Korean War. He joined the Foreign Service in 1955, and over the course of his 30 years of service, served at posts in seven countries across three continents. He served as consul general in Saigon during the Vietnam War, in Athens, Seoul, and was a principal officer in Naples. He retired from the Department of State in 1988. Kennedy founded and developed the Foreign Affairs Oral History Program of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training. He is survived by three children, Heather, Victoria, and Charles III; seven grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter.


May 2022

Catherine Lichtblau, 97, died Feb. 10, in Rockville, Md. Lichtblau studied art and fabric design at Skidmore College and worked as an advertising copywriter in New York. When her husband George joined the Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research in 1952, she joined him in Washington. Together, they served at posts in Côte d’Ivoire, Korea, and Israel where Lichtblau pursued her lifelong interest in textiles. She exhibited her works in the Washington area, Korea, and Israel, was a weaver-in-residence at Glen Echo Park, and collaborated with a Washington-based couturier. Lichtblau is survived by two children, Julia and Marcus; and two grandchildren, Zoë and Gabriel. 

Azita Raji, 60, died Feb. 6, in Belvedere, Calif. Born in Iran, Raji completed high school in Switzerland, where she competed nationally as a downhill skier and chess player, before moving to the United States at the age of 17. She became a U.S. citizen in 1988. Raji received a B.A. from Barnard College, and an M.B.A. from Columbia University. In her early career, Raji served as an international investment banker, holding senior positions at J.P. Morgan & Co., Salomon Brothers, and Drexel Burnham. In 2012, Raji served as national finance vice-chair and chair of the swing state victory fund for the Obama campaign. She was a national advisory board member of the Democratic National Committee, a member of the Obama for America National Finance Committee, served on The President’s Commission on White House Fellows, and she was also appointed as a commissioner of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. In 2016, President Barack Obama appointed Raji as the first female U.S. ambassador to Sweden (and first Iranian-American to serve as a U.S. ambassador), a position she served in until January 2017. Raji is survived by her husband, Gary Syman; and five daughters.

Kenneth “Ken” Lee Stanley, 68, died Feb. 9, in Chantilly, Va. Stanley served in the U.S. Army, prior to entering the Foreign Service in 1985. He served at posts in Israel, India, Russia, Germany, and Thailand before retiring in 2008. Stanley then went to work for computer and technology companies CACI International, Inc. and the Science Applications International Corporation. He enjoyed history, travel, and spending time with his family. Stanley was survived by his wife, Tatyana; two children, Melinda and Valery; two sisters, Sherrie and Hope; and one grandson, Lucas.

Noella B. Taylor, 72, died Nov. 26, 2021, in Greenville, S.C. Taylor joined the Foreign Service and served for 22 years at posts in Moscow, Dublin, Stockholm, Brussels, and Luxembourg. She retired in 2014, and enjoyed traveling and reminiscing with her friends. Taylor is survived by her husband, William; and a daughter, Tracy.


May 2022

Catherine Lichtblau, 97, died Feb. 10, in Rockville, Md. Lichtblau studied art and fabric design at Skidmore College and worked as an advertising copywriter in New York. When her husband George joined the Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research in 1952, she joined him in Washington. Together, they served at posts in Côte d’Ivoire, Korea, and Israel where Lichtblau pursued her lifelong interest in textiles. She exhibited her works in the Washington area, Korea, and Israel, was a weaver-in-residence at Glen Echo Park, and collaborated with a Washington-based couturier. Lichtblau is survived by two children, Julia and Marcus; and two grandchildren, Zoë and Gabriel. 

Azita Raji, 60, died Feb. 6, in Belvedere, Calif. Born in Iran, Raji completed high school in Switzerland, where she competed nationally as a downhill skier and chess player, before moving to the United States at the age of 17. She became a U.S. citizen in 1988. Raji received a B.A. from Barnard College, and an M.B.A. from Columbia University. In her early career, Raji served as an international investment banker, holding senior positions at J.P. Morgan & Co., Salomon Brothers, and Drexel Burnham. In 2012, Raji served as national finance vice-chair and chair of the swing state victory fund for the Obama campaign. She was a national advisory board member of the Democratic National Committee, a member of the Obama for America National Finance Committee, served on The President’s Commission on White House Fellows, and she was also appointed as a commissioner of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. In 2016, President Barack Obama appointed Raji as the first female U.S. ambassador to Sweden (and first Iranian-American to serve as a U.S. ambassador), a position she served in until January 2017. Raji is survived by her husband, Gary Syman; and five daughters.

Kenneth “Ken” Lee Stanley, 68, died Feb. 9, in Chantilly, Va. Stanley served in the U.S. Army, prior to entering the Foreign Service in 1985. He served at posts in Israel, India, Russia, Germany, and Thailand before retiring in 2008. Stanley then went to work for computer and technology companies CACI International, Inc. and the Science Applications International Corporation. He enjoyed history, travel, and spending time with his family. Stanley was survived by his wife, Tatyana; two children, Melinda and Valery; two sisters, Sherrie and Hope; and one grandson, Lucas.

Noella B. Taylor, 72, died Nov. 26, 2021, in Greenville, S.C. Taylor joined the Foreign Service and served for 22 years at posts in Moscow, Dublin, Stockholm, Brussels, and Luxembourg. She retired in 2014, and enjoyed traveling and reminiscing with her friends. Taylor is survived by her husband, William; and a daughter, Tracy.

Mark Scott Watson, 50, died March 19, in Washington, D.C. In 2012, Watson joined the Department of State’s Foreign Service Institute where he worked in the School of Language Studies Spanish section. He served as director of the Mexico City Immersion Program from 2016-2020, and briefly in 2021 he worked in the Venezuelan Affairs Unit in Embassy Bogota. Most recently, he served in the School of Language Studies in the Curriculum and Staff Development Division. Watson enjoyed learning languages, salsa dancing, and traveling while immersing himself in new places and cultures. He is survived by his spouse, Roberto.


April 2022

Madeleine Albright, 84, died March 23, in Washington, D.C. Born in Prague, Albright emigrated to the United States in 1948. She graduated from Wellesley College in 1959, just two years after becoming a U.S. citizen. In 1962, she studied at John Hopkins University—but midway through moved with her family to New York where she continued her studies—receiving an M.A. and Ph.D—from Columbia University. Albright served on numerous education boards, which led her to organize a fundraiser for 1972 presidential candidate U.S. Senator Ed Muskie. This led to a position as his chief legislative associate, and in 1978, Albright was recruited to work as the National Security Council’s congressional liaison. In 1980, Albright was given a grant for a research project from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars at the Smithsonian Institution. After that, she joined the academic staff at Georgetown University, directing the university’s program on women in global politics. She served as a Democratic Party foreign policy advisor, and was appointed by the Clinton Administration to handle the transition to a new administration at the National Security Council. In 1993, Albright served as ambassador to the United Nations, and in 1997, Albright was appointed as the 64th (and first female) secretary of state. Serving as secretary until 2001, Albright considerably influenced U.S. foreign policy in Bosnia, Herzegovina, and the Middle East and actively promoted the expansion of NATO and military intervention in Kosovo. After she left the Department of State, Albright was elected as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She founded and served as chair of the Albright Stonebridge Group, served as a professor at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service, was part of Dentons Global Advisors, served as chair of Albright Capital Management, president of the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation, chair of the National Democratic Institute, chair of the U.S. Defense Policy Board, and was an author. Albright is survived by three daughters, Anne, Alice, and Katie; a sister; a brother; and six grandchildren.

Paul A. Bialecki, 71, died Oct. 19, 2021, in Madison, Wisc. From 1971-1975, Bialecki served in the U.S. Army where he was stationed in Amberg, Bayern, and Germany. He then graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Parkside. In March 1978, he joined the Foreign Service. During his career, he served in Ouagadougou, N’Djamena, Lilongwe, Port Louis, London, Seoul, Helsinki, and also had two tours of duty in Washington. He retired in April 2002 and served as a state information technology manager at the Wisconsin Chapter of the Nature Conservancy for 10 years. Bialecki was a member of the American Foreign Service Association. He enjoyed traveling, was an avid reader, and loved to journal. He also enjoyed spending time with his family, cooking, gardening, hiking in nature, and taking long walks with his Welsh Terriers, Toby and Finley. Bialecki is survived by his wife, Sally; a sister, Kathleen; many nieces, nephews, and cousins.

Ellen Elizabeth Sartori, 94, died Jan. 31, in Washington, D.C. Sartori joined the Foreign Service as a secretary in 1962, and served for nearly three decades at posts in Somalia, Germany, Philippines, Lebanon, Paraguay, Ecuador, Panama, Holland, India, and Spain. She retired in 1990. In retirement, Sartori was devoted to her faith and lived at Little Sisters of the Poor in Washington for the last 15 years of her life. She is survived by a son, Anthony.


March 2022

Nelly Allegro, 86, died Dec. 3, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla. Allegro married her Foreign Service officer husband, James, in 1962. She joined him at posts in Managua, Lima, Kampala, Abidjan, Wellington, Guayaquil, Dusseldorf, Rome, and Montevideo. Allegro made friends at posts worldwide, was an avid reader, and spoke several languages. She is survived by four children, James Jr., Linda Grace, Frank, and John; and six grandchildren.

Dexter Anderson, 90, died Dec. 21, 2021, in Mystic, Conn. In 1953, Anderson received a B.A. from Yale University, and in the same year, enlisted in the U.S. Army, studying Russian at the Army Language School. In 1956, he married his childhood sweetheart and they spent a year in France while he studied at the University of Strasbourg on a Fulbright Scholarship. In 1957, he joined the Foreign Service and served at posts in West Germany, the USSR, Cameroon, and Switzerland. In 1986, he served with Voice of America in Washington, from which he retired in 1998. Anderson served as a volunteer radio operator at the Smithsonian, and also collected stamps and coins. He also enjoyed tutoring immigrants in English. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Ann; a sister-in-law; nieces; grand-nieces; and cousins.

Marshall “Joel” Kennedy Jr., 80, died Dec. 3, 2021, in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Kennedy joined the Department of State in 1970, serving as a diplomatic courier. He traveled the world, serving at posts in Thailand, Germany, and Bahrain. After 35 years with the Department, he retired in 2005 and moved to Florida. Kennedy volunteered at the Salvation Army soup kitchen and was a weekly Bingo player at the local Veterans of Foreign Wars post. He was an avid golfer and volunteered at the voting polls and the Valspar golf tournament annually. He was also a mason and veteran of the U.S. Army. Kennedy is survived by his wife, Jeanne; three kids Katherine, Elizabeth, and Brett; and five grandchildren.

John Paul Modderno II, 79, died Jan. 8, in Washington, D.C. Modderno attended the University of Georgetown prior to joining the Foreign Service in 1969. He served as chargé d’affaires in Nicaragua, and at posts in Vietnam, and China. He retired as a senior Foreign Service officer in 1993. In retirement, he enjoyed auditing classes at Yale University, and attending online lectures. Modderno is survived by his wife, Jamie Patricia Horsley; and four children, Elizabeth, Anne, John Paul III, and Jane. 

James Harmon Morton, 84, died Nov. 19, 2021, in Eastport, Maine. Morton joined the Department of State in 1964. He served as a Foreign Service officer at posts in Luxembourg, Greece, Switzerland, New Zealand, and Washington. Morton was Cyprus desk officer and director of Greek Affairs. He served as a congressional fellow, served in the Office of Congressional Relations focusing on African affairs, and served as director of Junior Officer Training. He served in the Department’s Operations Center and in the secretariat staff under Secretary of State William P. Rogers. Morton retired in 1987, but returned to the Foreign Service Institute as a consultant, training foreign diplomats in Albania, Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine, Bosnia, Croatia, Slovakia, Romania, Moldova, the Federated States of Micronesia, and Palau. He loved to travel, and he particularly liked to engage in bird photography. Morton is survived by his wife, Colleen (a Foreign Service officer); two sons, David and Luke; a brother, Donald; seven grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Joseph Presel, 79, died Dec. 19, 2021, in Washington, D.C. Presel joined the Foreign Service in 1963 upon graduation from Harvard College. He later continued his studies at St. Antony’s College at Oxford University. In a career spanning four decades, Presel specialized in Russian affairs and also worked extensively in multilateral diplomacy and political-military affairs. He served tours in Ankara, Paris, Moscow, Belgrade (as deputy chief of mission), and twice in the U.S. Arms Control Delegation in Vienna, the second time as deputy U.S. representative. In Washington, he served two assignments to the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, as well as tours in the Bureaus of European and Eurasian Affairs, Political-Military Affairs, International Organizations, and Intelligence and Research. He also had several assignments in the offices of Department of State principals. In 1993, Presel became deputy to the coordinator of U.S. assistance to the New Independent States (NIS) and coordinator for NIS Regional Affairs. He was later named special negotiator for Nagorno-Karabakh with the rank of ambassador, and in 1997, he served as ambassador to the Republic of Uzbekistan. His last tour in the Foreign Service was as professor at the United States Naval War College in Newport. After retiring in 2003, Presel worked in the private sector and at the Central Intelligence Agency. He taught Russian history at the university level, and served on a number of boards of directors. In recent years, he had divided his time between Washington and Paris. Presel is survived by his wife, Claire-Lise. 


February 2022

Andres “Nato” Agan Jr., 83, died Aug. 30, in Sun City, Ariz. Agan entered the U.S. Air Force in 1956 and served until 1985. He then joined the Department of State as an information management specialist and served at posts in Bucharest, Beirut, and finally Helsinki before retiring in 2003. He then volunteered as a temporary duty communications rover. Agan was a member of the International Brotherhood of Magicians, the Sons of Norway, and many other organizations. He enjoyed traveling, drawing and oil painting, and performing magic. He is survived by a daughter Andrea; stepson Michael; and two grandchildren.

Jules Beaudoin, 85, died Nov. 14, in Reddick, Fla. Beaudoin received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Maine. He served in the U.S. Navy as a radio operator—including service during the Korean War and the Berlin Crisis of 1961. He joined the Department of State in 1974 as a security engineer officer, and served at numerous posts during his career, including Hong Kong, Thailand, Germany, Washington, Kenya, Morocco, and Miami. Beaudoin retired in 1998, and he enjoyed flying his Cessna 152, sailing, amateur radio, skiing, camping, gardening, and motorcycling. He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Claudette. 

Joy-Lyn “Lynn Valley” Blake, 63, died April 13, in Ocean City, Wash. Blake joined the Foreign Service around 2008. She served in Addis Ababa, Kabul, Lahore, Luxembourg City, Ottawa, Paramaribo, Ankara, and most recently in Libya’s External Office where she was serving at the time of her death. Blake enjoyed theater and directing plays—including two plays that she directed at Embassy Kabul. She also enjoyed spinning raw wool into yarn. Blake is survived by her mother, Ann; and three siblings, Carol, Judith, and Daniel.

James “Jim” Blaine Davidson, died Nov. 29, in Rincon, Puerto Rico. While serving in the U.S. Navy, Davidson was stationed in Diego Garcia, Guam, and Taiwan. He then joined the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve in their International Affairs Office and later he worked for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, serving in Panama. In 1992, Davidson joined the Department of State, first as a civil servant, joining the Foreign Service two years later. He served as an information management officer in Peru, the Dominican Republic, Oman, Ecuador, the United Arab Emirates, Washington, and Venezuela. Davidson retired in 2014 and became an avid tennis player. He enjoyed the beach, surfing, and scuba diving. Davidson is survived by his wife, Josta; and daughter, Zoe.

Harald “Hal” G. Hoyesen, 73, died Nov. 5, 2021, in Santa Fe, N.M. Hoyesen joined the Foreign Service in 1976. During his career, he served at posts in Panama, Bangkok, Casablanca, and Rome. He retired in 1998, and went on to work for the energy company Halliburton and for  engineering company Kellogg, Brown, and Root. He officially retired in 2012. In retirement, Hoyesen spent time between his homes in Virginia and New Mexico, enjoying hiking, biking, gardening, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Linda; a brother, Andrew; along with many nephews, and extended family members.

Carol Joan Mills, 83, died Dec. 7, 2021, in Bedford, Va. In 1958, Mills graduated from Potomac State College. She went on to work as a secretary at a law office and then began serving with Brethren Volunteer Services in Washington. She joined USAID, and served in Thailand and Laos prior to joining the Department of State where she served as secretary to ambassadors at various posts worldwide. Her career included tours in Nicaragua, Hungary, South Korea, and Australia. In retirement, she enjoyed traveling and reading. Mills was predeceased by her parents and three sisters. She is survived by seven nephews and nieces, Richard, Thomas, Mark, Stephanie, Jonathan, Elizabeth, and Matthew. 

Suzanne P. Nagy, 60, died Aug. 3, in Alexandria, Va. Nagy accompanied her husband Dan Tikvart, a current-Foreign Service officer, on assignments to South Korea and Colombia, providing crucial support on the home front while he was assigned twice in Afghanistan. She began a 30-year long career serving her country with the U.S. Government Accountability Office and as a civilian for the U.S. Army, most recently with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. She also worked for the United Nations in Geneva and Vienna. In 2013, she earned her master’s degree from the National War College. Nagy was known for her sage advice to young professionals in the service. She is survived by her husband, Dan.

Daniel Patrick Sheerin, 62, died Dec. 12, in College Park, Md. In 1981, Sheerin joined the Department of State as an intern in the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs after graduating from Pennsylvania State University. He served in various capacities during his 40-year career with the Department, most recently as division chief of the Bureau of Information Resource Management’s Diplomatic Innovation Division in the Office of eDiplomacy. He retired this past September. Sheerin was an active soccer coach, swim team parent, Irish historian, avid Celtic F.C. soccer fan, poet, and Bruce Springsteen enthusiast. In 2008, he received a master’s degree from the U.S. War College. Sheerin is survived by his wife of 34-years, Sharon; and three children, Catherine, Daniel, and Patrick.

Kenneth Nordley Skoug Jr., 90, died Dec. 5, in Harleysville, Pa. In 1953, Skoug received a bachelor’s degree from Columbia College, followed by a master’s degree and Ph.D. from The George Washington University. Skoug served in the U.S. Army prior to entering the Foreign Service in 1957. He served at posts in Germany, Mexico, Czechoslovakia, the Soviet Union, two tours in Venezuela—one tour which he served as chargé d’affaires, and four tours in Washington. Skoug retired in 1990, and went on to publish two books. He enjoyed running, walking his dogs, bird watching, and reading. Skoug was predeceased by his wife of 50 years, Martha. He is survived by two children, Reed and Kenneth; and five grandchildren.


January 2022

Milburn “Gil” Garland Butler, 85, died Oct. 10, in Waldorf, Md. After a brief stint in the U.S. Army, Butler attended college in Colorado, then transferred to the University of Florida. After he graduated, Butler worked as a disc jockey eventually landing in roles in radio and television, first in Tampa, Fla., then Detroit, Mich., and finally in Washington where he served as a White House correspondent for the local CBS affiliate. In 1978, Butler joined the United States Information Agency’s Voice of America where he spent three decades covering 68 countries and serving abroad in Cairo, Beirut, Beijing, London, as well as in Washington. In retirement, Butler spent many years on a small horse farm in Accokeek, Md., tending to the farm, gardening, and spending time with his grandchildren. He enjoyed reading, and was a passionate follower of government and politics. He is survived by his wife, Judith; three children, John, Peter, and Melinda; six grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Rachel Leigh Jordan, 47, died Sept. 21, in Durham, N.C. Jordan attended school in Washington prior to joining the Department of State. She served for 20 years, retiring in 2011 from her position in the Bureau of Consular Affairs. Jordan relocated to Fayetteville, N.C. and enjoyed event planning, home décor, and acquiring unique items. Jordan is survived by her parents, John Jr., and Gloria; two children, Briana and Michael; a sister, Cecile; many aunts, including Shirley (fellow Department employee); two nieces; two god-sisters; and many uncles and cousins. 

Richard Lee Marx, 87, died Oct. 16, in Newnan, Ga. Upon graduation from University of Colorado, Marx enlisted in the U.S. Army. After serving a tour in Korea, he joined the Foreign Service and worked in New York City and Panama. He became a diplomatic courier in November 1963, and he served at posts in Frankfurt, Manila, Panama, Washington, and Bangkok. He retired in 1992. In retirement he enjoyed traveling, and outdoor work. He is survived by his wife of nearly 54 years, Joanne (a retired Foreign Service member), and a daughter, Joanna.

Dorothy Robins Mowry, 99, died July 6, in St. Michaels, Md. Mowry received a B.A. from the College of Wooster, and M.A. from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. from New York University. She joined the United States Information Agency in 1963, and served for almost 20 years in various roles including counselor, first secretary and reserve officer; policy officer/acting director for the Office of North African, Near Eastern, and South Asian Affairs; country officer for India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka; and program manager for U.S. Political and Social Processes Information Center Services. She also served as a cultural attaché in Tehran, and cultural programs officer in Tokyo. She retired in 1984, and was involved with the Talbot River Protection Association, St. Michaels Community Center Board, Riverview Garden Club, and supported youth sailing programs at the Miles River Yacht Club. Mowry was predeceased by her husband, David, and a daughter, Sarah. She is survived by two children, Lynn and Thomas; six grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren, a niece, and a nephew.

Thomas “Tom” J. Wallis, 58, died May 1, in Miami, Fla. Wallis attended Virginia Tech, and the National Defense Intelligence College. He obtained the rank of Staff Sergeant for his service in the U.S. Army, and served in Iraq. Wallis joined the Foreign Service in 2001 as a consular officer and served at posts in Jamaica, Germany, Belize, Malawi, and Peru. He is survived by his wife, Monica; his parents; and three brothers.

Connie Rae Helen Poli, 77, died Oct. 31, in Orlando, Fla. After graduating from high school, Poli began working for 3M and trained as a missionary where she was assigned a position in Seoul in the early 1970s. She then moved back to the U.S., where she studied nursing, eventually moving to Washington and joining the staff of Vice President Walter Mondale. She later moved to Honolulu where she finished her studies at the University of Hawaii in 1982. In 1986, she joined the Department of State serving in Nassau, and was quickly reassigned to Santiago. During her career, she served at posts in Panama, Bonn, Hanoi, Amman, Bangkok, Washington, and Brussels. She retired and moved to Ajijic, Mexico, and made frequent trips to Thailand and Southeast Asia during the winter months. In 2015, she and her husband moved to Arizona, and finally settled in Saint Cloud, Fla. She enjoyed yoga, meditation, reading, line dancing, walking, and traveling. Poli is survived by her husband of 35 years, Charles.

Brian William Wilson, 62, died June 12, in Fairfax, Va. After receiving a bachelor’s degree from Western Washington University in 1983, Wilson taught middle school English and drama. He joined the Foreign Service in 1985 and served in London, Belfast, Ciudad Juárez, Guatemala, and San Jose, as well as assignments in Washington. He served in the senior Foreign Service in the Bureau of Neareaster and Asian Affairs Executive Office, Bureau of Global Talent Management’s Office of Career Development and Assignments, director of Entry Level Career Development, and most recently as the executive director for the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs and Bureau of International Organization Affairs. Wilson enjoyed hiking, cycling, golfing, kayaking, and was an active community volunteer. He is survived by his wife, Julia; and two children, Peter and Grace.


Questions concerning employee deaths should be directed to the Office of Casualty Assistance at (202) 736-4302. Inquiries concerning deaths of retired employees should be directed to the Office of Retirement at (202) 261-8960. For specific questions on submitting an obituary, please contact Amanda McCarthy at mccarthyar@state.gov.

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